The rage of the oppressed is never the same as the rage of the privileged.

bell hooks (via smallbodies)

To all “egalitarians”

(via earthmoonlotus)

(via manhatingbabyeater)


I’m continually surprised by goyim who don’t know that they can’t call us Jews. Only Jews can call each other Jews. The rest of y’all need to say Jewish people. Just saying Jews if you are not a Jew is anti-semitic, and we will give you dirty looks (and feel v uncomfortable).


If anyone slaps you on the right cheek, turn to them the other cheek also
Matt 5:39

This specifically refers to a hand striking the side of a person’s face, tells quite a different story when placed in it’s proper historical context. In Jesus’s time, striking someone of a lower class ( a servant) with the back of the hand was used to assert authority and dominance. If the persecuted person “turned the other cheek,” the discipliner was faced with a dilemma. The left hand was used for unclean purposes, so a back-hand strike on the opposite cheek would not be performed. Another alternative would be a slap with the open hand as a challenge or to punch the person, but this was seen as a statement of equality. Thus, by turning the other cheek the persecuted was in effect putting an end to the behavior or if the slapping continued the person would lawfully be deemed equal and have to be released as a servant/slave.   

(via thefullnessofthefaith)

MOther FuCKeR

(via aintlifepeachy)

THAT makes a lot more sense, now, thank you. 

(via the-world-is-a-corner)

we’re doing this rn in theology class but im gonna be That Person and ask for a source because this sounds legit but if im gonna talk about this im gonna need to cite something

(via cisphobes)

ok found a few sources for this actually so Yes this seems like a solid reading of the quote

http://www.online-literature.com/forums/showthread.php?17076-quot-Turning-the-Other-Cheek-quot

http://www.ualberta.ca/~cbidwell/DCAS/third.htm (about a third of the way down)

I need someone to preach this. I’ll have to use it in some spoken word at church.

(via queennubian)

(via viomatic)


The best way to keep a prisoner from escaping is to make sure he never knows he’s in prison.
Fyodor Dostoevsky  (via mercurieux)

(via misandrygriffith)


Can the hungry go on a hunger strike? Non-violence is a piece of theatre. You need an audience. What can you do when you have no audience? People have the right to resist annihilation.

Arundhati Roy (via mllanders)

so perfectly put

(via rakaizombie)

I LOVE HER

(via saintnooneofnothing)

(via shakethecobwebs)


setfabulazerstomaximumcaptain:

sonic-hip-attack:

canikon-bokeh:

Exactly. 

Imagine a wall full of circular holes, that circles can keep walking in and out of with no difficulty.

Now imagine that the triangles manage to get the resources together, after years of not being able to fit through the circle’s holes, to drill a single triangle space into the wall.

Now imagine that the circle — who previously supported the triangle’s efforts because they are well-rounded (har) and value equality —  comes along and sees the construction project. But instead of being happy, they get angry.

“Well, I won’t be able to fit through your hole!!!!” the circle cries.

“I helped you get the drill!!!!” the circle shrieks.

“Make it fit me too!!!!” the circle demands.

The triangles, barely holding it together enough to get a triangle hole together, stare at the circle in confusion. 

“You have all the holes you need,” the triangles explain. “This is for us. You don’t need to fit through our hole, too.”

“YOU’RE BEING UNEQUAL AND HURTING MY FEELINGS!” the circle wails. “I DON’T SUPPORT YOUR HOLE IF IT DOESN’T FIT ME TOO. GIVE ME MY DRILL BACK.” 

“It’s not your drill, it’s our drill. You helped us get it, because you said you cared.”

“I ONLY CARED WHEN I THOUGHT YOU’D MAKE A HOLE EVERYONE COULD FIT THROUGH. YOU’RE PERPETUATING INEQUALITY!!!”

“Why is it up to us, the small group that has never been able to fit through the wall at all, to make a hole everyone can use? Why isn’t it up to you, the people who have been able to cross back and forth at will for years? We just want to see the other side; why are you yelling at us?”

“I DIDN’T ASK TO BE BORN A CIRCLE, OMG. I’VE HAD TO WORK HARD ALL MY LIFE TOO. YOU’RE JUST BEING BIGOTED AGAINST ME BECAUSE OF SOMETHING I CAN’T CONTROL, JUST LIKE EVERYONE IS AGAINST YOU.”

“You are interfering with our project and asking us to comfort you while we’re trying to make progress. Please leave.”

“I’m going to tell everyone about this,” the circle warns. “Nobody will support you now.”

“Apparently nobody ever did,” the triangles sigh, getting back to work.

It’s kind of sad

That we have to draw comics using colorful shapes

To explain systematic inequality to people

(via stupiduglyfatcunt)


If you put people in a cage, don’t be upset that they won’t let you in.

- A.J. Perna, concerning in-groups, subcultures, privilege, and colonialism. (via jellyfish-dance)

^ this

(via oparnoshoshoi)

!!! (via littlegee)

(via all-about-male-privilege)



aauw:

4 Reasons Why We Mark Women in Science & Technology Month
June is Women in Science and Technology Month, which is a great time to celebrate and reflect on the progress (or lack thereof) of girls and women in these critical fields. And here are four very good reasons why you should give a damn.
1. Because it’s time to fight back against gender bias. A study found that more than 70 percent of people subconsciously think of science and technology as ‘male’ fields. This stereotype isn’t just a harmless myth: it’s hurting women in the workplace. This month, we’ll be telling women’s stories about the discrimination they experienced in STEM fields. Gender bias is real. If you’ve experienced it, you’re not alone. And if we’re going to stop gender bias from holding women back, we need to acknowledge it now. We need to acknowledge that we can do better.
2. Because our nation is still behind in STEM education. When students all around the world were tested on their math and science skills, the US came in behind many other developed countries – especially American girls. Is STEM education in crisis in America? How do we solve it, and how do we better serve our girls? This month, we’ll be talking about some of the creative ways that educators are responding to the “STEM crisis”, and creating a better world for girls in the process.
3. Because women in science and technology are doing amazing things. Women’s achievements in the scientific fields are often overlooked or even attributed to their male peers. But look a little deeper, and you’ll see that despite institutional barriers and gender bias, women are still blazing new trails. You’ve probably heard of Marie Curie, and maybe you know that the element Meitnerium is named for a woman, Lise Meitner. But where are the Marie Curies and Lise Meitners of 2013? Well, everywhere! This month, we’ll be sharing ideas and projects from women today that are already changing the future of science and technology forever.
4. Because we believe in you. Hey, STEM ladies. We know that you’re the next generation of innovators, of role models, of heroes.  That’s why we need to tackle and overcome the challenges that women face in STEM today. Because if women have already achieved so much, just imagine what we could do if we started off on an equal playing field? The sky’s not even the limit!

aauw:

4 Reasons Why We Mark Women in Science & Technology Month

June is Women in Science and Technology Month, which is a great time to celebrate and reflect on the progress (or lack thereof) of girls and women in these critical fields. And here are four very good reasons why you should give a damn.

1. Because it’s time to fight back against gender bias. A study found that more than 70 percent of people subconsciously think of science and technology as ‘male’ fields. This stereotype isn’t just a harmless myth: it’s hurting women in the workplace. This month, we’ll be telling women’s stories about the discrimination they experienced in STEM fields. Gender bias is real. If you’ve experienced it, you’re not alone. And if we’re going to stop gender bias from holding women back, we need to acknowledge it now. We need to acknowledge that we can do better.

2. Because our nation is still behind in STEM education. When students all around the world were tested on their math and science skills, the US came in behind many other developed countries – especially American girls. Is STEM education in crisis in America? How do we solve it, and how do we better serve our girls? This month, we’ll be talking about some of the creative ways that educators are responding to the “STEM crisis”, and creating a better world for girls in the process.

3. Because women in science and technology are doing amazing things. Women’s achievements in the scientific fields are often overlooked or even attributed to their male peers. But look a little deeper, and you’ll see that despite institutional barriers and gender bias, women are still blazing new trails. You’ve probably heard of Marie Curie, and maybe you know that the element Meitnerium is named for a woman, Lise Meitner. But where are the Marie Curies and Lise Meitners of 2013? Well, everywhere! This month, we’ll be sharing ideas and projects from women today that are already changing the future of science and technology forever.

4. Because we believe in you. Hey, STEM ladies. We know that you’re the next generation of innovators, of role models, of heroes.  That’s why we need to tackle and overcome the challenges that women face in STEM today. Because if women have already achieved so much, just imagine what we could do if we started off on an equal playing field? The sky’s not even the limit!

(via witchbladehost)


generalbriefing:

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

the-friction-in-your-jeans:

So I just learned more about slavery in 15 minutes than I did in my entire time in the education system!

YESSSSSSSSSSS! This is great. Also, if you want to learn even more (and/or you just like books)

So this was pretty awesome and you guys should watch it.

“It is hugely important to emphasize that slaves DID resist their oppression. Sometimes this meant taking up arms, but usually it meant more subtle forms of resistance, like intentional work slow downs, or sabotaging equipment, or pretending not to understand instructions. And most importantly, in the face of systematic legal and cultural degradation, they reaffirmed their humanity through family and through faith. Why is this so important? Because too often in America we still talk about slaves as if they failed to rise up, when in fact rising up would not have made life better for them or for their families. The truth is, sometimes carving out an identity as a human being in a social order that is constantly seeking to dehumanize you is the most powerful form of resistance. Refusing to become the chattel that their masters believed them to be is what made slavery untenable and the Civil War inevitable, so make no mistake, slaves fought back, and in the end, they won.”

(via iamaperson)